What two statements are true about Fibre Channel zoning? (Choose two

What two statements are true about Fibre Channel zoning? (Choose two.)

A.
Zones define paths to a Fibre Channel array

B.
Zones control access to LUNs on a Fibre Channel storage array

C.
Zones can be soft or hard

D.
Zones can be configured on an array or ESXi host

19 Comments on “What two statements are true about Fibre Channel zoning? (Choose two

  1. Sido says:

    The link you reference first line states:

    “Zoning provides access control in the SAN topology. Zoning defines which HBAs can connect to which targets”.

    1. AnandRaj says:

      A & C is correct.

      Hard zone is defining path to the Array. (Port Zoning)

      Array connected using multiple Fabrics. Paths defined by Zone.

      Access control is by Mapping luns to the Array Port and Masking hosts in the array.

  2. Rick says:

    Seems like a semantic difference set up to confuse based on wording, since you can prevent access to LUNs by zoning, by making them invisible. But it is not really access control, so A and C are correct. The question is really “How do you define access control”

  3. Amim says:


    Reduces the number of targets and LUNs presented to a host.

    Controls and isolates paths in a fabric.

    Can prevent non-ESXi systems from accessing a particular storage system, and from possibly destroying VMFS data.

    Can be used to separate different environments, for example, a test from a production environment.

    So I would go on A,B

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp#com.vmware.vsphere.storage.doc_50/GUID-E7818A5D-6BD7-4F51-B4BA-EFBF2D3A8357.html?resultof=%2522%2553%2561%256e%2522%2520%2522%2573%2561%256e%2522%2520%2522%257a%256f%256e%2565%2522%2520

    1. Arie says:

      A and B cannot be the correct answer to this question as answer C is definitely correct, so you will have to choose between A and C or B and C.

    1. TwojaStara04 says:

      Zones control access to SPs (to the arrays) not to LUNs. By zoning you limits number of possible paths so poorly worded answer “Zones define paths to a Fibre Channel array” is OK IMHO.

      BTW what you think about this questions:
      1162 – B or C
      1336 – D and B or A
      1506 – D and C or A
      1488 – A
      1474 – A or C
      1467 – A or B or D
      1343 – C or D
      1549 – A or C or D
      1461 – ?
      371 – A or D

  4. Arie says:

    Answer C is correct and answer D is incorrect. That leaves us with answer A and B. One of these is correct, the other is incorrect. What does the documentation say about zoning?

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/topic/com.vmware.ICbase/PDF/vsphere-esxi-vcenter-server-50-storage-guide.pdf

    Using Zoning with Fibre Channel SANs

    Zoning provides access control in the SAN topology. Zoning defines which HBAs can connect to which targets.
    When you configure a SAN by using zoning, the devices outside a zone are not visible to the devices inside
    the zone.

    Zoning has the following effects:
    – Reduces the number of targets and LUNs presented to a host.
    – Controls and isolates paths in a fabric.
    – Can prevent non-ESXi systems from accessing a particular storage system, and from possibly destroying
    VMFS data.
    – Can be used to separate different environments, for example, a test from a production environment.

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-51/index.jsp#com.vmware.vsphere.storage.doc/GUID-39A4551F-4B03-43A6-BEDF-FAB1528C070D.html

    To restrict server access to storage arrays not allocated to that server, the SAN uses zoning. Typically, zones are created for each group of servers that access a shared group of storage devices and LUNs. Zones define which HBAs can connect to which SPs. Devices outside a zone are not visible to the devices inside the zone.

    Zoning is similar to LUN masking, which is commonly used for permission management. LUN masking is a process that makes a LUN available to some hosts and unavailable to other hosts.

    Based on “Controls and isolates paths in a fabric” you could think that answer A is correct, but besides this one sentence, the rest points to answer B; Zones control access to LUNs on a Fibre Channel storage array.

    I believe that the correct answer is B and C.

  5. Magus says:

    A & C are correct

    Zones permit SCSI traffic to flow between particular SCSI initiators to particular SCSI targets

    Masking is the presentation of LUNs to particular SCSI initiators and is used to control the access of host initiator to its assigned LUNs. In a typical array one has many more LUNs than array ports, so many LUNs will have to share ports. Having a zone from your host initiator to the port will not filter out the LUNs the host is not meant to have access to.

    Zones can only be created in a FC switch. Masking can be done at the array (99.999999% of the time) or at the host (0.000001% of the time)

    “Hard” and “Soft” zoning is actually a deprecated term by the FC switch folks, but it commonly (mis)used by folks to represent zones between FC Switch ports (hard) or between initiator/target Worldwide Names (WWNs)

  6. George says:

    I think access describes it better than paths. Your FC switch port has to be on the correct zone or your host can’t see anything in that zone on the array, however there is still a “path” to that zone. It isn’t until you match the zone that the path becomes accessible by the ESXi host.
    B&C


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *