What happened to the total number of shares provided to a resource pool by the parent pool (%Shares) if a virt

What happened to the total number of shares provided to a resource pool by the parent pool (%Shares) if a virtual machine is removed from the resource pool?

A.
Remains the same

B.
Decrease

C.
Increases

D.
Decreases

E.
Remains the same if a custom share value was configured. Increases if a high, medium, or low value was configured

9 Comments on “What happened to the total number of shares provided to a resource pool by the parent pool (%Shares) if a virt

  1. JAB says:

    Is this really correct,
    i created a resource pool added vm’s
    check the % share
    removed a vm
    check the % share
    its stayed the same

    can someone please expelling hit answer

  2. runwinged says:

    I believe A is correct.
    In http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-4-esxi-embedded-vcenter/index.jsp?topic=/com.vmware.vsphere.resourcemanagement.doc_41/managing_resource_pools/c_removing_virtual_machines_from_a_resource_pool.html,

    When you remove a virtual machine from a resource pool, the total number of shares associated with the resource pool decreases.
    That talks about different things.
    Name %Shares
    vm1 4000
    vm2 4000
    vm3 4000

    after vm3 is removed, the total number of shares associated with the resource pool decrease from 12000 to 8000.

    but the question is if a vm removed from one pool, what happened the %share outside the resource pool.
    Remains the same.

  3. kopigao says:

    I think JAB and runwinged is right, the answer should be A.

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp?topic=/com.vmware.vsphere.storage.doc_50/GUID-FC0346B1-7A32-4A49-9415-F93260367200.html

    When you remove a virtual machine from a resource pool, the total number of shares associated with the resource pool decreases, so that each remaining share represents more resources. For example, assume you have a pool that is entitled to 6GHz, containing three virtual machines with shares set to Normal. Assuming the virtual machines are CPU-bound, each gets an equal allocation of 2GHz. If one of the virtual machines is moved to a different resource pool, the two remaining virtual machines each receive an equal allocation of 3GHz.

  4. Taj says:

    D is the correct answer:

    You can remove a virtual machine from a resource pool either by moving the virtual machine to another resource pool or deleting it.

    When you remove a virtual machine from a resource pool, the total number of shares associated with the resource pool DECREASES, so that each remaining share represents more resources. For example, assume you have a pool that is entitled to 6GHz, containing three virtual machines with shares set to Normal. Assuming the virtual machines are CPU-bound, each gets an equal allocation of 2GHz. If one of the virtual machines is moved to a different resource pool, the two remaining virtual machines each receive an equal allocation of 3GHz.

  5. mkbell says:

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp?topic=/com.vmware.vsphere.storage.doc_50/GUID-FC0346B1-7A32-4A49-9415-F93260367200.html
    ESXi and vCenter Server 5 Documentation > vSphere Resource Management > Managing Resource Pools

    Remove a Virtual Machine from a Resource Pool
    You can remove a virtual machine from a resource pool either by moving the virtual machine to another resource pool or deleting it.

    When you remove a virtual machine from a resource pool, the total number of shares associated with the resource pool DECREASES, so that each remaining share represents more resources. For example, assume you have a pool that is entitled to 6GHz, containing three virtual machines with shares set to Normal. Assuming the virtual machines are CPU-bound, each gets an equal allocation of 2GHz. If one of the virtual machines is moved to a different resource pool, the two remaining virtual machines each receive an equal allocation of 3GHz.

  6. sam says:

    I tested it in a lab, it was Decreased. all you need is create two pools
    drag the VMs around and take look the resource allocation tab of the pool.

  7. Rich says:

    If you have 2 resource pools with the same share value, each resource pool gets 50% of the resources. If you remove a VM from one of the resource pool, the resource pool still gets 50% of the resources.

    Removing the VM decreases the total shares within the resource pool, but not the relationship of shares between the two resource pools.


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